How Search Engines Work

How Search Engines Work

How Search Engines Work

Search Engine A web-based software system designed to search for information on the World Wide Web, these engines display search results in the line of results known as results pages. These results contain information mixed with different web pages, images and videos. The algorithm works, and most search engines are businesses that earn the most from advertising. Volume 0%  
 

The most famous search engines WebCrawler. Lycos. Daum. Excite effects. Sapo sapo. Yahoo! Dogpile. HotBot. Ask Jeeves. Yandex. Google. Ixquick. MSN Search Engine. Genie Knows. Naver. Baidu. Exalead ZEEF. Yasi YaCy.
 

How Search Engines Work Engines store information for many web pages. Engines get this information from a web crawler known as a spider. Hunkbot indexes results on a search engine. Exclude the robotics protocol; this technique is often used to remove sites that contain malware or indecent information. The search engine analyzes the content it gets from the Web. It analyzes it page after page to find out how it can be indexed again. Query them later. The user searches for a specific topic, using keywords known as keywords, and the search engine here studies these words to provide the user with the results. Evolution of search engines Ashi was the first search engine, and was designed in 1909 by a group of computer science students studying at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. Matthew Gray made the first robot on the Internet in 1993. The first online search engine was launched in September 1993 at the University of Geneva, and was named W3Catalog. Launched in 1988, the world's largest search engine, known as Google, remains the number one top search engine.